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Five Wonderful Hiking Trails in Canada

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Through the eyes of Paula...

Canada is full of gorgeous and natural landmarks, so it is no wonder that the country has a vast amount of hiking trails. For people who want to engage in an adventurous, breathtaking (both from awe and physical exertion) activity this summer, here are just five beautiful hiking trails that Canada has to offer.

1. Fundy Trail, New Brunswick: Southern New Brunswick holds a rare gem – one of North America’s last remaining coastal wilderness areas between Labrador and Florida. Hidden for many years, this unspoiled retreat is now open for hikers and cyclists to explore. Less than an hour’s drive from Saint John, the Fundy Trail unlocks 16 kilometres of seaside beauty. The winding trails lead to sandy beaches, concealed waterfalls, and vertigo-inducing cliffs. Here, you can get a unique perspective of the Bay of Fundy’s tides, as well as catch a glimpse of whales and sea birds.

2. Kejimkujik National Park, Nova Scotia: Kejimkujik National Park is truly one of a kind. Nowhere else in the country will you find a Parks Canada site that is designed as both a National Park and a National Historic Site. With its rare old growth forests, abundant wildlife, Mi’kmaq legends, and geological finds, Kejimkujik National Park offers an unforgettable hiking experience. Boasting fifteen unique trails, the park lets visitors encounter rare species of birds, historical sites including gold mines), granite boulders, and vibrant foliage.

3. Killarney Park, Ontario: Considered a crown jewel of Ontario’s park system, Killarney Park came into existence by the dedicated efforts of several famous Canadian artists. The Group of Seven’s Lawren Harris, A.J. Casson, and A.Y. Jackson were so enamored with this rugged landscape that they approached the government, demanding that the area be designated as protected parkland. Thanks to their efforts, Killarney’s jack pine ridges, clear lakes, and quartz hills are here today. Four hiking trails, including the picturesque Granite Ridge Trail, give visitors exceptional access to La Cloche Mountains, Georgian Bay, and the spectacular beauty immortalized by the Group of Seven’s iconic paintings.

4. Kinney Lake Trail, British Columbia: For stunning lakeside and mountain views, head to Mount Robson Provincial Park – the second oldest provincial park in British Columbia. Towering overhead at 3,954 metres is the snow-capped Mount Robson, the highest peak in the Canadian Rockies. The sheer size of this majestic summit will have hikers spellbound as they wander along the 4.5 km Kinney Lake Trail. Amidst the dense cedar and hemlock forest, eagle-eyed visitors may have the once in a lifetime chance to see many wildlife species including moose, Black bears and elk. This hike will take approximately 2.5 hours to complete.

5. Grey Owl Trail, Manitoba: If you tread carefully along northern Manitoba’s Grey Owl Trail, you might be fortunate enough to spot white-tailed deer, beaver, foxes, and maybe a moose or coyote. Deep in Riding Mountain National Park, this gentle trail takes hikers on a 17 km journey through sandy beaches, Jack pine forests, and clusters of aspen, poplar, and balsam trees. For six months in 1931, this untamed corner of the Canadian Shield was the home of Archie Belaney, a dedicated conservationist who became known as Grey Owl. Wandering along the path that bears his name, you’ll quickly understand why Grey Owl fought so hard to preserve the forests and fauna of this breathtaking area. The 5-hour hike concludes rather fittingly at the Beaver Lake cabin where Grey Owl lived and worked as the first naturalist of Canada’s park system.

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Guest Monday, 24 July 2017